How to Really Listen in Conversations 

Listening: the poor man’s talking. But your turn to pay attention to someone else’s blah blah will come. Here’s how to be the kind of listener you’d like to talk to.

Cash Nickerson is the author of The Samurai Listener, which is kind of a mashup of business advice and a how-to on listening that leans heavily on western ideas of the way of the Samurai. Fast Company interviewed Nickerson for some easy tips on how to improve your ability to not just hear what people are saying, but to really listen.

Get Off Your Phone

This is basic politeness, but if someone is talking to you and you’re scrolling through Instagram, you are not paying attention. Much of our communication comes from more than words, and you’re not noticing enough about someone to get the subtext. Unless they’re on their phone, too—in which case I think they’re probably saying they don’t want to be having this conversation either.

Keep Your Opinions To Yourself

Not forever, of course. But when you’re discussing something, you won’t really be able to receive what the other person is saying if you can’t let go of your ideas about what they’re saying first. There are some opinions I personally don’t ever want to let go of, but if you want to really understand someone’s point of view, sitting through the end of it without interrupting will help.

Advertisement

“Listening helps you handle conflict, express respect and be a better leader,” Nickerson says. “Unfortunately, most people don’t remember because they don’t hear it in the first place.”

An article in Psychology Today says something similar, describing it as “consciously deciding to give input.” You are leading someone so you can learn more, not shutting them down:

The good listener is secure enough to rationally decide whether, in any given situation, to add input or to just listen and possibly ask follow-up questions. Don’t let your desire to impress trump what’s best for the interaction and the desired outcome. In the right situation, restraint can be just as compelling. Do you add content to a conversation only when wise?

Do you? Or are you just listening to get revved up to talk?

Read Between The Lines

Another thing mentioned by Psychology Today is the importance of noticing what is not being said. They give the example of talking to someone who never wants to discuss personal relationships, but is always willing to chat about work. That’s kind of a red flag if you’re on a date, but great if you’re looking for a business partner. And if, say, you were an investigative reporter, you would probably notice the topics that your subject kept turning away from—and push harder in those directions.

Advertisement

Most of us aren’t conducting an interrogation, but still, there’s a lot to learn about someone based on what they avoid talking about. Listen for the silences.

Work On Comprehension

A lot of misunderstandings can be avoided with a few simple questions. If you’re not one hundred percent sure what someone is saying, try to rephrase it and ask if that’s what they mean. You won’t look stupid—you’ll look like you give a crap. That’s all most people want.

Get to the Heart of It

Once you’ve got a hold of the facts, you need to understand someone’s reason for sharing them. This is something I personally do when I’m interviewing a person for a story, or even when I’m on a date: I analyze what they’re saying in the moment, but instead of responding with my own opinion, I double check.

“You’ve said A and B. Does that mean you believe C?”

That gives them the opportunity to clarify, or agree. People rarely tell you a story for no reason. Figuring out what that reason is is the challenge.

Keep Trying

This all sounds exhausting. It is! Listening actively is a skill that’s honed, and one you can employ or not. There are also whole courses on listening, because not everyone you listen to is a good talker. Sometimes people are boring, meandering, and distracted. But sometimes they have useful information. You should know how to extract it.

Know When To Quit

Sometimes you just can’t listen! I cannot pay attention to someone when I’m hangry, exhausted or stressed, and all three of those things can come up in the course of a long talk. Sunny Sea Gold wrote in Scientific American that she had been accused of being a bad listener by her husband. She interviewed psychology researcher John Stewart, author of U&Me: Communicating in Moments That Matter, in an effort to improve. Stewart said that it’s very important to know when you’re no longer able to pay attention:

“Genuine listening requires humility and curiosity—and neither can be successfully faked,” Stewart says. If you’re not feeling well, if you’re hurried, rushed or overly stressed, you’re not going to be able to be truly present and curious during a conversation, especially a tough one.

Convincing someone that it’s time to pause is an entirely different skill from listening, but here’s something you can say:

Advertisement

“I think this conversation is important, but I need some time so I can give it my undivided attention.”

And if someone doesn’t get that, they’re the one who needs to work on listening.


via Lifehacker
How to Really Listen in Conversations 

How Cruise Ships Work

How Cruise Ships Work

Link

Cruise ships seem to offer a lot of bang for your buck, and some do sell tickets at a loss. PolyMatter points out some of the many ways that cruise ship companies make or save money, such as flying under different flags, offering one-way trips and having casinos.

via The Awesomer
How Cruise Ships Work

Computer History Museum Makes Eudora Email Client Source Code Available To the Public

Computer History Museum (CHM), an institution which explores the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, announced on Tuesday the public release and long-term preservation of the

Eudora source code

, one of

the early

successful

email clients

, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. From the

press release

:

The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh. In 1991, Qualcomm licensed Eudora from the University of Illinois and distributed it free of charge. Qualcomm later released Eudora as a consumer product in 1993, and it quickly gained popularity. Available both for the IBM PC and the Apple Macintosh, in its heyday Eudora had tens of millions of users. After 15 years, in 2006, Qualcomm decided that Eudora was no longer consistent with their other major project lines, and they stopped development. The discussion with Qualcomm for the release of the Eudora source code by the company’s museum took five years.

Len Shustek, the chairman of the board of trustees of the Computer History Museum,

writes

:

Eventually many email clients were written for personal computers, but few became as successful as Eudora. Available both for the IBM PC and the Apple Macintosh, in its heyday Eudora had tens of millions of happy users. Eudora was elegant, fast, feature-rich, and could cope with mail repositories containing hundreds of thousands of messages. In my opinion it was the finest email client ever written, and it has yet to be surpassed. I still use it today, but, alas, the last version of Eudora was released in 2006. It may not be long for this world. With thanks to Qualcomm, we are pleased to release the Eudora source code for its historical interest, and with the faint hope that it might be resuscitated. I will muse more about that later.

via Slashdot
Computer History Museum Makes Eudora Email Client Source Code Available To the Public

Forewarned is Forearmed – Springfield Armory

by Steve Tarani, Originally Posted here.

Forewarned is Forearmed
Forewarned is Forearmed

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- Living in a world where extreme physical violence can erupt at a moment’s notice, it’s important to be armed with more than only one weapon!

The most effective way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun – a good guy who has the skills to stop the threat (AKA – you). However, to rely solely on a carry pistol as your only response tool puts you at a tactical disadvantage.

In addition to a lightweight, compact, easily-accessible handgun, you’re also armed with a weapon that requires no bullets, batteries or carry permit. Your most powerful weapon for avoiding or mitigating an active threat will always be YOUR MIND.

We’ve all heard the term “situational awareness,” but what exactly is it? Simply put, situational awareness (S/A) is an awareness of your immediate environment. Should one of your five senses pick up a threat indicator, such as seeing a bad guy across the street moving toward you with a knife, hearing gunfire, smelling smoke, etc., you are forewarned of a potential physical threat. The extra few seconds or even minutes in some cases, affords you the opportunity to not be there, should the threat continue to evolve.

Real-world examples are easy to come by. In Salzburg, Austria lampposts are being covered in airbags to stop “smartphone zombies” from bumping into them as they walk around staring at their screens. Really. Here at home it’s the same thing – you don’t have to look very hard to find people texting while driving or walking. All of their awareness is focused around a 6” radius of their device-holding hand. How would they know if something threatening was unfolding in their immediate environment?

That’s how S/A gains you a tactical advantage – by giving you knowledge… plus time. If you happen to hear gunfire or observe an active shooter before they observe you, those precious seconds are valuable chunks of time that you may need to make a judgment call, take flight or fight. If you choose to take flight, which is the safest of the two options, then that borrowed time can help get you out of effective threat range and/ or possibly behind cover or into hiding.

Should your decision be to fight, then those very valuable quarter seconds just bought you immediate response opportunity. More time equals more opportunity to solve the tactical problem.

Sufficient time is required to defeat your cover garment, clear your pistol from its holster, and verify that you have a good backstop. All of this takes some amount of time before you can point your muzzle toward the bad guy(s), align your sights and initiate your trigger press.

Buying yourself this required time, places you in a dominant posture. This position would not have been afforded you, had you not applied your S/A, and were instead caught behind the action/ reaction power curve of an active threat.

Being situationally aware is one of the most powerful tools you can have in your tool kit. Combined with a good firearm, you can decrease your vulnerability and gain the tactical advantage of being forewarned and forearmed.


About Steve TaraniSteve Tarani

Steve Tarani, is a former CIA protective services subject matter expert who served on Donald Trump’s pre-election protection detail and is the lead instructor for the NRA’s new Non-ballistic Weapons Training program offered nationally to 2.3 million members. Tarani, an active protective agent, is a Central Intelligence Agency and FLETC-certified federal firearms instructor who also provides services for the US Naval Special Operations Command, FBI National Citizens Academy Alumni Association, National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO), and others.

The post Forewarned is Forearmed – Springfield Armory appeared first on AmmoLand.com.

via AmmoLand.com
Forewarned is Forearmed – Springfield Armory

Gun owners, non-owners agree on these proposals

Gun owners and people who don’t own firearms often agree on their support for new gun regulations, a survey shows.

The survey, which measured support for 24 different proposed gun policies, found minimal gaps in support between gun owners and non-owners on 15 of those policies.

“Policies with high overall support among both gun owners and non-gun owners may be the most feasible to enact,” says lead author Colleen Barry, “and some have strong evidence to support their ability to reduce gun violence.

“Widespread claims that a chasm separates gun owners from non-gun owners in their support for gun safety policies distracts attention from many areas of genuine agreement—areas that can lead to policy solutions and result in the prevention of gun violence,” says Barry, chair of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

For the 2017 survey, researchers used the National Opinion Research Center’s AmeriSpeaks online panel, designed to be representative of the US population. The sample included 2,124 adults (602 gun owners, 1,522 non-gun owners).

As reported in the American Journal of Public Health, in 2016, firearms were responsible for more than 38,000 US deaths and 116,000 nonfatal gunshot wounds treated in US hospitals.

Particularly in the wake of recent school shootings and mass shootings in Las Vegas and elsewhere, Americans continue to debate measures at both the state and federal levels that seek to address gun violence.

The proposals covered in the survey with the highest overall support and minimal support gaps between gun owners and non-owners were:

  • Universal background checks before gun purchases (support from 85.3 percent of gun owners and 88.7 percent of non-gun owners)
  • License suspension for gun dealers who cannot account for 20 or more guns in their inventory (82.1 percent of owners, 85.7 percent of non-owners)
  • Higher safety training standards for concealed carry permit holders (83 percent of owners, 85.3 percent of non-owners)
  • Improved reporting of mental illnesses for background checks (83.9 percent of owners, 83.5 percent of non-owners)
  • Gun prohibitions for people subject to temporary domestic violence restraining orders (76.9 percent of owners, 82.3 percent of non-owners)
  • Gun violence restraining orders, commonly referred to as extreme risk protection orders or Red Flag laws (74 .6 percent of owners, 80.3 percent of non-owners)

The survey did find several areas of greater disagreement between owners and non-owners, though several of those proposals still had majority support even from owners.

Nine of 24 policies covered in the survey had greater than 10 -point support-gaps, including:

  • Requiring that a person lock up guns in the home when not in use to prevent access by youth (support from 58 percent of gun owners and 78.9 percent of non-owners)
  • Giving police and the public information about gun dealers that sell the most guns later used in crimes (62.9 percent of owners, 73.4 percent of non-owners)
  • Requiring a person to obtain a license from local law enforcement before buying a gun (63.1 percent of owners and 81.3 percent of non-owners)
  • Allowing cities to sue gun dealers when there is evidence that the dealer’s practices allow criminals to obtain guns (66.7 percent of owners, 77.9 percent of non-owners).
Survey: 54% of gun owners break gun safety rules

Two questions on concealed carrying were new in the 2017 survey.

  • As many as 42.6 percent of gun owners but only 19.3 percent of non-gun owners believed a person who can legally carry a gun should be allowed to bring that gun onto K-12 school grounds.
  • But both 83 percent of gun owners and 85.3 percent of non-owners believed that a person who can legally carry a concealed gun should have to pass a test demonstrating they can safely handle the gun in common situations they may encounter.

“There is data supporting the efficacy of many of the policies with wide support among both gun owners and those who don’t own guns,” says coauthor Daniel Webster, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research.

Americans have ‘complicated’ views on guns

“Relatively few states have these laws in place. This signals an opportunity for policy makers to enact policies which are both evidence-based and widely supported.”

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and the Smart Family Association funded the work.

Source: Johns Hopkins University

The post Gun owners, non-owners agree on these proposals appeared first on Futurity.

via Futurity.org
Gun owners, non-owners agree on these proposals

Preppers and Unrealistic Prepping Plans

Prepping is divided into various categories.  There are the realistic preppers who prep for stuff like hurricanes and other natural disasters; the bug out preppers, who plan on bugging out to the wilderness; and the prepsteaders, such as myself who are working on developing a homestead.

Then there are the armchair preppers who talk about stuff that is so far off the wall their plans are unrealistic.  For example, in 2015 I posted a video on YouTube about trespassers scouting the bug out location.

The gist of the video was of people trespassing on private property.  Whoever it was crossed a creek, and walked up on my land far enough to see a shed and the back of a field.  Just a little further and they could have seen the back of my house.

Someone posted a comment on the video stating, “This why you do not have neighbors.”

Let me get this straight, preppers are not supposed to have neighbors? Are we supposed to live so far in the boonies nobody else wants to live near us? We talked about this in the forum – Survivalist Living Too Far in the Boonies.  There comes a point where someone is living so far in the boonies even driving to town is an all day affair.

Then there is the issue of urban creep.  Land bought today in the boonies may have neighbors in 10, 20 or 30 years.  Land has a way of changing hands.  Property may be seized for back taxes, then auctioned off.  Then the land my turn into someones home.  Elderly people pass away, and the kids sell the land.

The person who posted the comment, when someone buys land next to his, what would he be xpected to do?  Maybe sell his land and relocate?

It is unrealistic to buy land, then move when someone buys land next to you.  How is someone supposed to set down long term roots if they are relocating every few years?  How is someone supposed to develop an orchard, build anything… selling and relocating every year?

Anyway, here is the video mentioned earlier.

The post Preppers and Unrealistic Prepping Plans appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

via All Outdoor
Preppers and Unrealistic Prepping Plans

Capturing Per-Process Metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)

In this blog post, I will show you how to use Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) to capture per-process metrics in five minutes or less.

While Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) captures a lot of host metrics, it currently falls short providing per-process information, such as which particular process uses a lot of CPU resources, causes Disk IO or consumes a lot of memory.

In our database performance optimization and troubleshooting practice, this information has proven quite useful in many cases: batch jobs taking much more resources than developers would estimate and misconfigured Percona XtraBackup or Percona Toolkit are among the most common offenders.

Per-process metrics information can also be very helpful when troubleshooting database software memory leaks or memory fragmentation.

You don’t know which processes cause you problems at the outset, so it is important to capture information about all of the processes (or specifically exclude the processes you do not want to capture information about) rather than capture information about selected few.

While capturing such helpful information is not available in PMM out of the box (yet), you can easily achieve it using PMM’s External Exporter support and the excellent Prometheus Process Exporter by Nick Cabatoff.

These instructions are for Debian/Ubuntu  Linux Distributions but they should work with RedHat/CentOS based versions as well – just use RPM package instead of DEB

1: Download the process exporter packages from GitHub:

2: Install the package

(Note: the file will be different depending on the platform and current release.)

3: Run the Exporter

4: Register Exporter with Percona Monitoring and Management

Assuming the current node is already monitored by PMM you just need one command:

This captures process metrics every 10 seconds (adjust interval if desired).

Important note: due to some internal limitations, you need to use a different service name (“processes-my-host”)  for each host. I suggest just adding the hostname to the descriptive name “processes” for simplicity.

5: Get Matching Dashboard from Grafana.com

While you can browse the data captured by the Advanced Data Exploration Dashboard, it is not any fun. I created a PMM-style dashboard and published it on Grafana.com. I based it on Nick’s original dashboard.

To add this dashboard to your PMM Server, click Dashboard Search on your PMM Server.

PMM Per-Process Metrics

From there, click on “Import Dashboard”. Use 6033 as the Grafana.com Dashboard ID.

PMM Per-Process Metrics

6: You’re done!

You should have data flowing, and you should be able to see the data on the graphs.

PMM Per-Process Metrics

In this example, I have pt-query-digest (shown as Perl) parsing the log file and pushing MySQL Server away from memory.

Note, as you likely have many processes on the system, the graphs are designed to show only the top processes. All running processes, however, are available in the drop-down if you want to access the history for a specific process.

Let us know what you think. We are looking at how to integrate this functionality directly into Percona Monitoring and Management!

Peter Zaitsev

Peter managed the High Performance Group within MySQL until 2006, when he founded Percona. Peter has a Master’s Degree in Computer Science and is an expert in database kernels, computer hardware, and application scaling.

via Planet MySQL
Capturing Per-Process Metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)

How to set up MySQL InnoDB Cluster? Part One

This post is about setting up MySQL InnoDB Cluster with 5 nodes on a sandbox deployment.  Here, we focus on implementation part, the core concepts will be explained in separate posts.

Prerequisites:
  • MySQL Engine
  • MySQL Shell
  • MySQL Router
Deploying MySQL InnoDB Cluster involves the following steps:
  • Deploying MySQL Engine (Sandbox Instance)
  • Creating an InnoDB Cluster
  • Adding nodes to InnoDB Cluster
  • Configuring MySQL Router for High Availability.
  • Testing High Availability.

Deploying MySQL Engine:

If the MySQL engines are already installed on all the nodes, you can skip this step and directly move into creating an InnoDB Cluster part.
I am deploying 5 Sandbox instances (which is in-built on MySQL Shell application) on a same machine. On production system, there will be separate nodes for each MySQL Engines. Let’s begin with the deployments:

To open MySQL Shell     : Start -> cmd -> Type mysqlsh (OR) Start -> MySQL Shell

To change script mode  : \JS – JavaScript Mode | \PY – Python Mode | \SQL – SQL Mode
MySQL JS > dba.deploySandboxInstance(port)


deploySandboxInstance()module will deploy new Sandbox Instance on the mentioned port, let’s deploy the following 5 Sandbox instances:

dba.deploySandboxInstance (3307)

dba.deploySandboxInstance (3308)

dba.deploySandboxInstance (3309)

dba.deploySandboxInstance (3310)

dba.deploySandboxInstance (3311)


Sample Output:


MySQL JS > dba.deploySandboxInstance (3307)

A new MySQL sandbox instance will be created on this host in

C:\Users\rathish.kumar\MySQL\mysql-sandboxes\3307

Warning: Sandbox instances are only suitable for deploying and running on your local machine for testing purposes and are not accessible from external networks.

Please enter a MySQL root password for the new instance: ***

Deploying new MySQL instance…

Instance localhost: 3307 successfully deployed and started.

Use shell.connect(‘root@localhost:3307’); to connect to the instance.

MySQL JS >


To connect the deployed sandbox instance:

MySQL JS > \connect user@host:portand enter the password when prompted. (OR)

MySQL JS > shell.connect(‘user@host:port’)


Sample Output:


MySQL localhost: 3307 ssl JS > \connect root@localhost:3307

Creating a session to ‘root localhost: 3307’

Enter password: ***

Fetching schema names for auto completion… Press ^C to stop.

Closing old connection…

Your MySQL connection id is 16

Server version: 8.0.11 MySQL Community Server – GPL

No default schema selected; type \use
MySQL localhost: 3307 ssl JS > \ssl

Switching to SQL mode… Commands end with;

MySQL localhost: 3307 ssl SQL > select @@port;

+——–+

| @@port |

+——–+

|   3307 |

+——–+

1 row in set (0.0006 sec)

MySQL localhost: 3307 ssl SQL >


Creating InnoDB Cluster:

To create an InnoDB cluster, connect to seed (primary) server, which contains the original data by using above method and follow the below steps:
var cluster = dba.createCluster(‘ClusterName’)

Sample Output:

MySQL localhost:3307 ssl  JS > var cluster = dba.createCluster(‘DBCluster’)
A new InnoDB cluster will be created on instance ‘root@localhost:3307’.
Validating instance at localhost:3307…Instance detected as a sandbox.

Please note that sandbox instances are only suitable for deploying test clusters for use within the same host.

This instance reports its own address as L-IS-RATHISH

Instance configuration is suitable.

Creating InnoDB cluster ‘DBCluster’ on ‘root@localhost:3307’…

Adding Seed Instance…

Cluster successfully created. Use Cluster.addInstance() to add MySQL instances.

At least 3 instances are needed for the cluster to be able to withstand up to one server failure.

Adding nodes to InnoDB Cluster:
The secondary replication nodes will be added to cluster by using the addInstance() method.

mysql-js> cluster.addInstance(‘user@host:port’)

Let us add the nodes, one by one:


cluster.addInstance(‘root@localhost:3308’);

cluster.addInstance(‘root@localhost:3309’);

cluster.addInstance(‘root@localhost:3310’);

cluster.addInstance(‘root@localhost:3311’);

Sample Output:

MySQL  localhost:3307 ssl  JS > cluster.addInstance(‘root@localhost:3311’);

A new instance will be added to the InnoDB cluster. Depending on the amount of data on the cluster this might take from a few seconds to several hours.

Please provide the password for ‘root@localhost:3311’: ***

Adding instance to the cluster …

Validating instance at localhost:3311…

Instance detected as a sandbox.

Please note that sandbox instances are only suitable for deploying test clusters for use within the same host.

This instance reports its own address as L-IS-RATHISH

Instance configuration is suitable.

The instance ‘root@localhost:3311’ was successfully added to the cluster.

Configuring MySQL Router for High Availability:
MySQL Router routes client connections to servers in the cluster and it provides separate ports for Read and Read/Write operations.

MySQL Router takes its configuration from InnoDB Cluster’s metadata and configure itself by using –-bootstrap option. It is recommended to install MySQL Router on a separate server or can be installed on the application server.

The MySQL Router command is given below, this should be run on the server with Read/Write (R/W) role.


shell> mysqlrouter –bootstrap user@host:port

The server roles can be checked by using the status() method. Let us check the status of our cluster:


MySQL  localhost:3307 ssl  JS > cluster.status()

{

    "clusterName": "DBCluster",

    "defaultReplicaSet": {

        "name": "default",

        "primary": "localhost:3307",

        "ssl": "REQUIRED",

        "status": "OK",

        "statusText": "Cluster is ONLINE and can tolerate up to 2 failures.",

        "topology": {

            "localhost:3307": {

                "address": "localhost:3307",

                "mode": "R/W",

                "readReplicas": {},

                "role": "HA",

                "status": "ONLINE"

            },

            "localhost:3308": {

                "address": "localhost:3308",

                "mode": "R/O",

                "readReplicas": {},

                "role": "HA",

                "status": "ONLINE"

            },

            "localhost:3309": {

                "address": "localhost:3309",

                "mode": "R/O",

                "readReplicas": {},

                "role": "HA",

                "status": "ONLINE"

            },

            "localhost:3310": {

                "address": "localhost:3310",

                "mode": "R/O",

                "readReplicas": {},

                "role": "HA",

                "status": "ONLINE"

            },

            "localhost:3311": {

                "address": "localhost:3311",

                "mode": "R/O",

                "readReplicas": {},

                "role": "HA",

                "status": "ONLINE"

            }

        }

    },

    "groupInformationSourceMember": "mysql://root@localhost:3307"

}

 MySQL  localhost:3307 ssl  JS >

The server root@localhost:3307 is currently assigned with R/W role. Configure MySQL Router on this server:


C:\Windows\system32>mysqlrouter –bootstrap root@localhost:3307

Please enter MySQL password for root:

Reconfiguring system MySQL Router instance…

WARNING: router_id 1 not found in metadata

MySQL Router has now been configured for the InnoDB cluster ‘DBCluster’.

The following connection information can be used to connect to the cluster.

Classic MySQL protocol connections to cluster ‘DBCluster’:

– Read/Write Connections: localhost:6446

– Read/Only Connections: localhost:6447

X protocol connections to cluster ‘DBCluster’:

– Read/Write Connections: localhost:64460

– Read/Only Connections: localhost:64470

Existing configurations backed up to ‘C:/Program Files/MySQL/MySQL Router 8.0/mysqlrouter.conf.bak’

Connecting InnoDB Cluster:

From MySQL Router configuration, we get the connection information, by default, port 6446 used for Read /Write connections and Port 6447 used for Read/Only connections. MySQL Router allows to configure custom port numbers for R/W and R/O client connections.

Let us connect to first connect to Read/Write port and then connect to Read/Only port for testing.

Read/Write Instance:


C:\Users\rathish.kumar>mysql -u root -h localhost -P6446 -p

Enter password: *

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.

Your MySQL connection id is 176

Server version: 8.0.11 MySQL Community Server – GPL

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select @@port;

+——–+

| @@port |

+——–+

|   3307 |

+——–+

1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> create database ClustDB;

Query OK, 1 row affected (0.09 sec)

mysql> use ClustDB;

Database changed

mysql> create table t1 (id int auto_increment primary key);

Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.18 sec)

mysql> insert into t1 (id) values(1);

Query OK, 1 row affected (0.06 sec)

Read/Only Instance:


C:\Users\rathish.kumar>mysql -u root -h localhost -P6447 -p

Enter password: *

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.

Your MySQL connection id is 47

Server version: 8.0.11 MySQL Community Server – GPL

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select @@port;

+——–+

| @@port |

+——–+

|   3308 |

+——–+

1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from ClustDB.t1;

+—-+

| id |

+—-+

|  1 |

+—-+

1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into ClustDB.t1 (id) values (2);

ERROR 1290 (HY000): The MySQL server is running with the –super-read-only option so it cannot execute this statement

mysql>

Testing High Availability:

We have connected to R/W and R/O instances, and it is working as expected. Now let’s test the High Availability by killing primary seed node (3307) and Read/Only instance (3308).


dba.killSandboxInstance(3307)

dba.killSandboxInstance(3308)

Sample output:


MySQL  localhost:3307 ssl  JS > dba.killSandboxInstance(3307);

The MySQL sandbox instance on this host in

C:\Users\rathish.kumar\MySQL\mysql-sandboxes\3307 will be killed

Killing MySQL instance…

Instance localhost:3307 successfully killed.

Now refresh run the query on the existing Read/Write and Read/Only connections and check the port:          

Read/Only Instance:


mysql> select @@port;

ERROR 2006 (HY000): MySQL server has gone away

No connection. Trying to reconnect…

Connection id:    38

Current database: *** NONE ***

+——–+

| @@port |

+——–+

|   3310 |

+——–+

1 row in set (1.30 sec)

mysql>

This error is due to connection rerouting while we are still connected to server. This error will not occur on new connections. Let us try with Read/Write connections:

Read/Write Instance:


C:\Users\rathish.kumar>mysql -u root -h localhost -P6446 -p

Enter password: *

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.

Your MySQL connection id is 32

Server version: 8.0.11 MySQL Community Server – GPL

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select @@port;

+——–+

| @@port |

+——–+

|   3311 |

+——–+

1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

There is no changes required from applications, the InnoDB Cluster will identify the changes and automatically configure itself and high availability achieved with the help of MySQL Router.

I suggest you to test InnoDB Cluster on lab environment and share your findings on comment section for other readers. I will be coming with other articles on working with InnoDB Cluster and Troubleshooting InnoDB Cluster. Need of any assistance on InnoDB Cluster, please share it on comment section.

via Planet MySQL
How to set up MySQL InnoDB Cluster? Part One

Behind the Scenes at the Disney ‘Morgue’ Where Animation History Is Being Saved

GIF

Gizmodo went behind the scenes at the “Disney Morgue” to see how Walt Disney’s animation history is being preserved for future generations. The morgue has everything from the earliest drawings for short cartoons like Mickey Mouse’s Steamboat Willie (1928) to animation cels from movies like Snow White and the Seven Dwarves (1937) to stunning reference art from films like Moana (2016).

It’s a rare glimpse at the people and their technologies that are working to make sure that Disney’s animation history is around for generations to come.

In the early days of animation, many of the major studios saw animation cels as disposable after a movie was finished. But today, those fragments of animation history are recognized as treasures that give us a peek at how some of our favorite movies were made. Unfortunately, those pieces of art history naturally degrade with time.

Advertisement

“The cels degrade naturally by the nature of the material that they’re made of,” said Kristen McCormick of the Walt Disney Animation Research Library.

Animation art, just like old film itself, must be handled carefully. But even if they’re handled with the utmost care, they’re still going to become damaged simply through the passing of time. The cels warp and shrink over the years, deteriorating through a process called hydrolysis. Gizmodo also talked with Michael Schilling, lead scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, about how they’re working on restoring damaged animation art.

“If the humidity is raised to just the right level, the paint will actually reattach to the plastic sheet,” said Schilling, describing the painstaking process of restoring the cels.

Both Schilling and McCormick talk about how incredible it is to watch these old Disney films today. Their jobs have given them a new appreciation for the work that went into these classics. And it inspires them to continue the work that they do to preserve these important pieces of history. They love their jobs, and it’s clear that you would too if you got a chance to work with such unique treasures from the history of Disney animation.

Advertisement

“I always see something new each day,” McCormick told Gizmodo about what her job is like. “And I’m always astounded by the beauty of the pieces.”

via Gizmodo
Behind the Scenes at the Disney ‘Morgue’ Where Animation History Is Being Saved